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Space at the heart of new business class seats for Emirates

Emirates has unveiled a new business class cabin and configuration on its Boeing 777-200LR, following a US$150+ million investment to refurbish the 10 existing 777-200LR aircraft in its fleet.

The newly refurbished 777-200LR aircraft is set in a two-class configuration offering 38 business class seats and 264 seats in economy class.

 While retaining the same design and shape of Emirates’ latest lie-flat seats – with champagne coloured finish and diamond stitch pattern on the full leather cover, and ergonomically designed headrest – the business class seats are two inches wider.

With a pitch of 72 inches and ability to move into a fully flat sleeping position, the seat includes touchscreen controls for the seat and in-flight entertainment system, several personal lighting options, privacy panels between seats, a shoe stowage area, footrest and a personal mini-bar.

To increase the feeling of spaciousness, overhead bins in centre of the cabin have been removed.

The cabin also features the Ghaf tree – considered the national tree of the United Arab Emirates, and now a signature design on the latest Emirates aircraft.

In addition, the new business class cabin features a social area – unique to the Boeing 777-200LR fleet. The mini lounge area features snacks such as crisps, sandwiches and fruit, as well as beverages for customers to help themselves to during the flight.

Economy class seats have also been refreshed to the latest colour palette of soft greys and blues. The ergonomically designed seats come with full leather headrests that have flexible side panels and can also be adjusted vertically for optimum support. The aircraft is also equipped with Wi-Fi and Live TV across all classes.

 The newly refurbished 777-200LR aircraft will go into service on 6 March to Fort Lauderdale, the first of 10 aircraft to be retrofitted with the new configuration over the course of the year.

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