New air travel research centre opened in Canada

The National Research Council Canada has launched the new Centre for Air Travel Research to study the air travel experience throughout the journey.

Managed by the National Research Council Canada, the organisation say it is the world’s first facility to study the air travel experience from check-in to terminal, security to boarding, flying and deplaning.

The Centre for Air Travel Research has five laboratories that simulate and study a passenger’s complete air travel experience. The center offers a realistic recreation of an airport terminal, and also features the Flexible Cabin Laboratory, with an A320 aircraft cabin that allows for the study of passenger flight experience, human vibration and more.

The National Research Council of Canada said the new research center provides the industry with a collaborative space to develop, integrate and evaluate aerospace technologies, systems and materials.

Located next to the Ottawa International Airport, the facility aims to allow companies to evaluate a passenger’s complete air travel experience to improve safety, efficiency and comfort for Canadian travellers and visitors.

“Using a holistic approach, our simulator draws from our team’s diverse knowledge base in areas like environmental controls, vibration, avionics, and human factors to help improve passenger comfort, safety and en-route efficiency,” said Iain Stewart, president of the National Research Council Canada. “We are proud to be investing in technology platforms that will be critical for the long-term success of the aerospace industry.”

“Our government is working to make sure that the Canadian aerospace industry is in the best possible position to meet customers’ needs and remain competitive,” said the Honourable Navdeep Bains, minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development. “By launching the world’s first and only center dedicated to improving customers’ air travel experience, Canada is demonstrating that it’s at the leading edge of innovation.”

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